Gabriel García Marquez Nuestro Gran Escritor

Mar 6, 2018 by

Magical Realism

Google celebrates Colombian novelist Gabriel García Márquez’s 91st birthday with a Doodle on March 6, 2018.
Google

By LAIGNEE BARRON

Updated: March 6, 2018 2:38 AM ET

On what would have been his 91st birthday, Google Doodle is celebrating Gabriel García Márquez, or “Gabo,” as the man once called “the greatest Colombian who ever lived” was affectionately known.

In García Márquez’s novels angels fall to Earth and become carnival attractions, magic carpets fly and priests levitate. The Colombian author defined the genre of magical realism, in which the mundane and the fantastic occur with equal plausibility. He said he was inspired by the unbelievability of Latin American history — an illusory Eldorado plagued by conquistadors, despots and revolutions.

“We have had to ask but little of imagination, for our crucial problem has been a lack of conventional means to render our lives believable,” he said in his acceptance speech for the Nobel Prize in Literature, which he won in 1982.

Colombian writer and Nobel prize in literature winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez poses in Carthagena, Colombia on Feb. 20,1991.
Colombian writer and Nobel prize in literature winner Gabriel Garcia Marquez poses in Carthagena, Colombia on Feb. 20,1991.
Ulf Andersen—Getty Images

Born in Aracataca, Colombia On March 6, 1927, he was raised by his maternal grandparents. He attributed his gift for storytelling to his grandfather, a hero of the Thousand Days War, when Liberal generals revolted against the ruling Conservatives. García Márquez attributed his fascination with the supernatural to his grandmother’s belief in ghosts, omen and portents.

He showed a passion for writing early on, and studied journalism, as well as law to please his father, at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia in Bogota. After bloody riots and the assassination of a popular presidential candidate led to the closure of his university in 1948, García Márquez quit school to become a journalist.

“I’ve always been convinced that my true profession is that of a journalist. What I didn’t like about journalism before were the working conditions,” he told the Paris Review in 1981.

 

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